Table of Contents

1. Monday, 9 September 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded
2. On Hospitals in Ships by thomaslsnyder at Of Ships & Surgeons
3. “You Can Get a Lot Out of Them” by NHHC at Naval History Blog
4. Sunday, 29 September 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded
5. Persian Wars: Greeks Turn the Tide at Salamis by n/a at About.com Military History
6. Seaman Si – the Funniest ‘Gob’ in the Navy by DisneyDave at Disney – Toons At War
7. HMDB Civil War Updates – Week of September 27 by Craig Swain at To the Sound of the Guns
8. Why Didn’t We Listen to Their War Stories? by noreply@blogger.com (Jimmy Price) at Over There
9. Cdr Cassin Versus the Pirates 28 September 1822 by NHHC at Naval History Blog
10. Flogging Outlawed 160 Years Ago Today by NHHC at Naval History Blog
11. Friday, 27 September 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded
12. 2010 Bonhomme Richard Survey Completed! by Underwater Archaeology at Naval History Blog
13. Ancient Egypt: Chariots Attack at Kadesh by n/a at About.com Military History
14. Lt.(j.g.) Kenneth M. Willett, D-v(G), Usnr: Extraordinary Heroism and Conspicuous Courage by Ships History at Naval History Blog
15. Pea Ridge: a Restored Battlefield by Craig Swain at To the Sound of the Guns
16. 92 Years Ago Today by noreply@blogger.com (Jimmy Price) at Over There
17. Thursday, 26 September 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded
18. “The Glory and Triumph” of Kansas by noreply@blogger.com (Ron Coddington) at Faces of War
19. Massed Artillery in the West: Pea Ridge by Craig Swain at To the Sound of the Guns
20. Sidney Byron Smith by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project
21. Wednesday, 25 September 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded
22. Mexican-American War: Taylor Takes Monterrey by n/a at About.com Military History
23. USS Constellation Captures the Slave Ship Cora by NHHC at Naval History Blog
24. Druid’s ‘the Silver Tassie’ by George Simmers at Great War Fiction
25. Afternoon Remarks by Dr. Horton – the Unfinished Civil War by noreply@blogger.com (Jimmy Price) at The Sable Arm
26. Bruce Levine – the Myth of Black Confederates by noreply@blogger.com (Jimmy Price) at The Sable Arm
27. Tuesday, 24 September 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded
28. Hewitt &Amp; Bergeron (Eds.): &Quot;Confederate Generals in the Western Theater, Vol. 2: Essays on America’s Civil War&Quot; by noreply@blogger.com (Drew@CWBA) at Civil War Books and Authors
29. Two American Sailors Come Home After 67 Years by UltimaRatioReg at Other Military History Stuff
30. 1997 Royal Navy Field Gun Competition by Jason Kottke at Other Military History Stuff

Contents

1. Monday, 9 September 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded

Saturday’s bombing of London isn’t quite as prominent on the
front page of the Daily Mail as one might expect. There are a
few small items about it (e.g. a panorama of London ablaze,
taken from the top of Northcliffe House; a report from
Italian radio that Londoners are ‘absolutely terrified’ by
the raids) but there’s actually more about the threatened
German invasion (including a report of false alarms in
Surrey, the south-west and Scotland). And the main article,
by air correspondent Noel Monks, deals with both. It reports
that yesterday was a fairly quiet day, and that London’s…

2. On Hospitals in Ships by thomaslsnyder at Of Ships & Surgeons

According to the International Red Cross, the history of
hospital ships, at least in the west, starts in the 17th
century, when navies began to routinely send ships intended
for the care of wounded and sick sailors and soldiers in
company with fleet actions. In the 17th and 18th centuries,
naval authorities chose veteran combat vessels for hospital
use. Typically these tired men-of-war served as warehouses
for the sick and wounded–victims of the rigors and
deprivations of long distance sailing, or of war. During the
19th century, the procedure of taking ships up from
trade–contracting civilian…

3. “You Can Get a Lot Out of Them” by NHHC at Naval History Blog

In September 1942, the Navy’s Bureau of Aeronautics
interviewed Col. R.F.C. Vance, the Senior Army Air Corps
Staff Officer at Port Moresby, New Guinea. Vance primarily
spoke about the role of Intelligence Officers, and the
difficulties they experienced in debriefing Allied plane
crews after combat missions. He noted the most difficult
problem was when the [...]…

4. Sunday, 29 September 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded

Friday witnessed the signing of the ‘Axis-Japanese Pact’ in
Berlin. The Observer’s diplomatic correspondent believes the
pact is ‘chiefly aimed at the United States’, and ‘is
intended to steal a march on what is regarded as the
inevitable alignment of Britain, America, Russia, and China’
(7): Under it, the Axis and Japan pledge each other military
aid should any of them be attacked by a Power not at present
involved in the European or China wars. The belief that
America will eventually enter the war is a common one (and
reflected here by the claim that the likely American…

5. Persian Wars: Greeks Turn the Tide at Salamis by n/a at About.com Military History

September 480 BC – The Greek fleet wins the Battle of
Salamis. Having been defeated at the Battle of Thermopylae,
the Greeks were forced to abandon Athens and retreat to the
Isthmus of Corinth. As the Persians advanced, the Greek fleet
found shelter at Salamis. Though Xerxes I wished to flank the
Greek position by crossing the Saronic Gulf, he first was
required to deal with the Greek fleet. Led by Themistocles,
the Greek ships at Salamis were located behind a narrow
strait which would negate the Persian’s numerical superiority
in a battle. After a series of political intrigues, Xerxes
attempted…

6. Seaman Si – the Funniest &Quot;Gob&Quot; in the Navy by DisneyDave at Disney – Toons At War

Here’s a little hardcover 95-page booklet published in 1918
that I added to the collection quite awhile ago. The art was
created by Perce Pearce who started at the Disney Studio in
February 1935. Pearce was employed as a story man, producer,
and director. The booklet tells the story of Seaman Si and is
subtitled, “The Adventures of a Blue Jacket on the High Seas
of Fun and Adventure.” The art was created while Pearce was
stationed at the U.S. Naval Training Station, Great Lakes,
Illinois. At the time, Great Lakes was the largest naval
training center in the…

7. Hmdb Civil War Updates – Week of September 27 by Craig Swain at To the Sound of the Guns

This week, thirty-eight additions to the Civil War category
in the Historical Marker Database. States represented are
Alabama, Connecticut, Georgia, Kansas, Kentucky, Missouri,
New Jersey, Ohio, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and Wisconsin.
– The Tannehill Ironworks near McCalla, Alabama provided
kettles, … Continue reading →…

8. Why Didn’t We Listen to Their War Stories? by noreply@blogger.com (Jimmy Price) at Over There

As I have been contemplating the 92nd anniversary of the
Meuse-Argonne Offensive, I had planned on writing a piece
examining why this crucial battle is nearly forgotten today.
But then I realized, why do this when my friend Ed Lengel has
already done so in masterful fashion?The following article
was originally published in the Washington Post on May 25,
2008.The last known surviving U.S. veteran of what was once
called the Great War, Cpl. Frank Buckles of Charles Town,
W.Va., recently toured the World War I memorial in
Washington. Accompanied by his daughter and an aide, the…

9. Cdr Cassin Versus the Pirates 28 September 1822 by NHHC at Naval History Blog

Piracy in the West Indies has long been the stuff of tall and
romantic tales. In the first few decades of the 19th century
seafarers operating under the dubious authority of
short-lived revolutionary South American governments fighting
for survival against a vengeful Spain claimed to be
legitimate privateers, but more often acted as cutthroat
pirates, [...]…

10. Flogging Outlawed 160 Years Ago Today by NHHC at Naval History Blog

In flogging, the most common means of enforcing discipline in
the early U.S. Navy, a cat-o-nine-tails, a whip composed of
nine knotted ropes, was applied to the bare back. Its
defenders considered flogging swift and effective, while, in
contrast to confinement, it quickly returned a sailor to
duty. The majority of naval officers, and probably [...]…

11. Friday, 27 September 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded

The Daily Mail has some good news to splash on its front
page today. (The Times dourly leads with the story of yet
another record air raid on Berlin.) Another 46 survivors have
been rescued from the lost liner SS City of Benares, which
was reported as sunk last Monday. They drifted in the
Atlantic for eight days before being spotted by a Sunderland
flying boat. As well as ‘British and Lascar seamen’ there
were six boys, aged between 9 and 16, along with two adult
minders, who were being evacuated to Canada but are doubtless
quite happy to have…

12. 2010 Bonhomme Richard Survey Completed! by Underwater Archaeology at Naval History Blog

The second survey this year for Bonhomme Richard has been
successfully completed. Dr. Robert Neyland, NHHC’s Underwater
Archaeology Branch Director, together with the Ocean
Technology Foundation , Naval Meteorology and Oceanography
Command Naval Oceanographic Office, Office of Naval Research
, and U.S. Naval Academy worked aboard the USNS Henson to
survey a 70 sq nautical [...]…

13. Ancient Egypt: Chariots Attack at Kadesh by n/a at About.com Military History

1274 BC – Egyptian and Hittite forces clash at the Battle of
Kadesh. Advancing north to reclaim lost lands, Ramses II
neared Kadesh with an army consisting of four divisions.
Fooled by Hittite spies into believing that the enemy army
was far away, he rushed forward with two divisions to seize
Kadesh. In doing so his trailing division was mauled by
attacking Hittite chariot forces. Pursuing the retreating
Egyptians into the other division’s camp, the Hittites
pressed their attack before commencing looting. Rallying his
men, Ramses was able to drive off part of the Hittite force
before reinforcements joined him. Pushing…

14. Lt.(j.g.) Kenneth M. Willett, D-v(G), Usnr: Extraordinary Heroism and Conspicuous Courage by Ships History at Naval History Blog

Lieutenant (j.g.) Kenneth Martin Willett, D-V(G), had been
born in Overland, Missouri, on 9 April 1919. He had attended
Sacramento Junior College, majoring in Business and Geology,
and had enlisted in the U.S. Naval Reserve on 9 July 1940.
Accepting an appointment as Midshipman, USNR, on 10 August,
and Ensign, D-V(G), on 14 November, he [...]…

15. Pea Ridge: a Restored Battlefield by Craig Swain at To the Sound of the Guns

Yesterday I closed saying Pea Ridge was a well restored and
maintained battlefield. Yes restored. When established in
1956, Pea Ridge National Battlefield Park included over 4,000
acres of the core battlefield area. Unlike many other fields,
at Pea Ridge … Continue reading →…

16. 92 Years Ago Today by noreply@blogger.com (Jimmy Price) at Over There

The Meuse-Argonne Offensive began. Never forget….

17. Thursday, 26 September 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded

Page 4 of The Times: For the second night in succession
heavy bombers of the R.A.F. have attacked military objectives
in the heart of Berlin. During the raid, which lasted over
two and a half hours, two factories making electrical
equipment, a power station, a foundry, and a canal bridge
were all bombed. Page 1 of the Daily Mail: GERMANY, thanks to
the R.A.F., is at last tasting the bitter medicine her Air
Force administered to the defenceless Poles, Dutch, Belgians,
and the French. From many neutral sources yesterday came
unimpeachable evidence of the shock with which the R.A.F.’s…

18. “The Glory and Triumph” of Kansas by noreply@blogger.com (Ron Coddington) at Faces of War

While reading the March 21, 1862, edition of The Liberator,
an article about the formation of the Kansas Emancipation
League reminded me of the war to end slavery in the state and
the dedication of those citizens to overthrow slavery by
force of arms. This excerpt caught my attention:War teaches,
in such startling language that none not willfully blind can
fail to read its import—that Union is impossible, and Freedom
a myth, while Slavery exists. Liberty deals with Human, and
not alone with National life. In it is no geography—no
race—no color. MAN is more than all…

19. Massed Artillery in the West: Pea Ridge by Craig Swain at To the Sound of the Guns

In his report of the Battle of Pea Ridge, Captain Louis
Hoffmann, Forth Independent Battery, Ohio Light Artillery
recounted his activities on March 8, 1862: The battery was
placed on the left wing of the First Division, on a high …
Continue reading →…

20. Sidney Byron Smith by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project

Sidney Byron Smith was born on August 31, 1838, in New York,
the son of Torry (b. 1794) and Jane (b. 1804).Vermont natives
“Torry” and Jane were presumably married in Vermont where
they were living in 1830 when their son Henry was born.
(Torry was listed as living in Burlington, Chittenden County,
Vermont in 1830.) Sometime between 1832 and 1838 the family
moved to New York, eventually moving further westward and
settling in Michigan by 1840. By 1850 “Byron” was attending
school with his siblings and living with his parents on a
farm in Ada, Kent County. By 1860…

21. Wednesday, 25 September 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded

Berlin has had its longest and heaviest raid of the war so
far (the lengthening nights would be making it easier for the
RAF to get there and back under cover of darkness). The Air
Ministry reported the raid as follows (as reported by the
Manchester Guardian on page 5): Throughout last night
[Monday] strong bomber forces of the R.A.F. delivered a heavy
attack on military objectives in and around Berlin. This
attack was on a much larger scale than any yet carried out,
and preliminary reports show that extensive damage was done.
Among the targets selected by our aircraft…

22. Mexican-American War: Taylor Takes Monterrey by n/a at About.com Military History

September 21-24, 1846 – American forces under Major General
Zachary Taylor win the Battle of Monterrey (right). Having
won victories at Palo Alto and Resaca de la Palma, Taylor was
reinforced and ordered to attack the city of Monterrey.
Forced by a lack of transportation to leave many of his men
behind, he moved south with around 6,600 men in August 1846.
Reaching the city, Taylor dispatched Brig. Gen. William Worth
on flanking march to the west while he conducted a
diversionary strike on the northeastern side of the city.
While Worth had success, Taylor took heavy losses in brutal…

23. Uss Constellation Captures the Slave Ship Cora by NHHC at Naval History Blog

Late in the evening on September 25, 1860, while patrolling
the waters off West Africa, USS Constellation captured the
slave ship Cora with 705 Africans imprisoned on her slave
deck. From 1859 to 1861, the sloop of war Constellation
(1854) served as flagship of the United States Navy’s African
Squadron, a fleet of eight vessels [...]…

24. Druid’s ‘the Silver Tassie’ by George Simmers at Great War Fiction

I’d like to see a Tank come down the stalls, Lurching to
rag-time tunes, or ‘Home, sweet Home’ wrote Siegfried Sassoon
in 1917, in a brutal fantasy about forcing civilians to
understand the reality of war. Yesterday afternoon at the
Oxford Playhouse, I saw Sassoon’s vision made real. At the
end of the second act of O’Casey’s The Silver Tassie, the
monstrous tank that has dominated the set begins to lurch
forward threateningly, and just as you think it is going to
crush the first row of the stalls, there is an almighty
explosion, and then a blackout. You…

25. Afternoon Remarks by Dr. Horton – the Unfinished Civil War by noreply@blogger.com (Jimmy Price) at The Sable Arm

26. Bruce Levine – the Myth of Black Confederates by noreply@blogger.com (Jimmy Price) at The Sable Arm

27. Tuesday, 24 September 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded

Things are on the move again, at least in French West
Africa. De Gaulle’s Free French, assisted by the Royal Navy,
are attempting to wrest control of Dakar from their Vichy
brethren. A naval battle was raging there yesterday
afternoon, though presumably it is over now. According to the
Ministry of Information, this action was necessary because
the ‘Germans were making were making persistent efforts to
bring Dakar under their control’ (4). According to the Vichy
foreign minister, M. Baudoin, this is worse than
Mers-el-Kebir, as it is ‘not simply a question simply of
ships, which might be…

28. Hewitt &Amp; Bergeron (Eds.): &Quot;Confederate Generals in the Western Theater, Vol. 2: Essays on America’s Civil War&Quot; by noreply@blogger.com (Drew@CWBA) at Civil War Books and Authors

29. Two American Sailors Come Home After 67 Years by UltimaRatioReg at Other Military History Stuff

This release from the Department of Defense today: The
Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) announced today
that the remains of two servicemen, missing in action from
World War II, have been identified and are being returned to
their families for burial with full military honors. Navy Lt.
Francis B. McIntyre of Mitchell, S.D., will be buried on
Sept. 29, and Aviation Radioman Second Class William L.
Russell of Cherokee, Okla., will be buried on Oct. 1. Both
men will be buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

On Nov. 10, 1943, the two men took off on a bombing and
strafing…

30. 1997 Royal Navy Field Gun Competition by Jason Kottke at Other Military History Stuff

This might not sound like much, but you need to watch this
video of the 1997 Royal Navy Field Gun Competition. In it,
two teams compete to navigate themselves and a cannon through
an obstacle course: over walls, across chasms, and through
small gaps in walls. The strength and coordination displayed
here is amazing…it’s like watching NFL linemen do ballet.
(via migurski) Tags: video…