Table of Contents

1. WWII History for Sept 22 by Steven Terjeson at World War II History
2. “They Considered Our Squadrons as One.” by NHHC at Naval History Blog
3. Two Naval Hospitals in New York State (Closed) by thomaslsnyder at Of Ships & Surgeons
4. Nathan Jeduth Smith by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project
5. Sunday, 22 September 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded
6. The Forgotten Theaters? by Craig Swain at To the Sound of the Guns
7. The Bismarck and the Hood by Charles McCain at World War II History
8. Guest Post by Dr. Dave Winkler Entitled “William S. Sims and Training to Shoot” by NHHC at Naval History Blog
9. Saturday, 21 September 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded
10. Hmdb Civil War Updates – Week of September 20 by Craig Swain at To the Sound of the Guns
11. Jonathan T. Smith by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project
12. The Forty-Five: Jacobites Stun at Prestonpans by n/a at About.com Military History
13. U.S. Navy Seabee Museum Update by NHHC at Naval History Blog
14. 20-Pdr, or 3.67-Inch, Navy Parrott Rifle by Craig Swain at To the Sound of the Guns
15. Fleet Admiral Chester Nimitz, Usn by NHHC at Naval History Blog
16. “Roughshod Through Dixie: Grierson’s Raid 1863″ by noreply@blogger.com (Drew@CWBA) at Civil War Books and Authors
17. Thursday, 19 September 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded
18. Wars of the French Revolution: the Guns of Valmy by n/a at About.com Military History
19. U S Naval Hospital Sampson Ny by thomaslsnyder at Of Ships & Surgeons
20. James v. Smith by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project
21. Wednesday, 18 September 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded
22. Tuesday, 17 September 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded
23. 2010 West Coast Civil War Conference by noreply@blogger.com (dw) at of Battlefields and Bibliophiles
24. Thirty Years’ War: Gustavus Adolphus at Breitenfeld by n/a at About.com Military History
25. Raaf Biographical Files From the Second World War by Jessie Webb at Australian War Memorial
26. Commemorating the Battle of Marathon by noreply@blogger.com (Tim Kendall) at War Poetry
27. Wagner: “Patrick Connor’s War: the 1865 Powder River Indian Expedition” by noreply@blogger.com (Drew@CWBA) at Civil War Books and Authors
28. Monday, 16 September 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded
29. Sunday, 15 September 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded
30. Ball’s Bluff: a Little Battle With Lasting Consequences « Government Book Talk by n/a at Other Military History Stuff

Contents

1. Wwii History for Sept 22 by Steven Terjeson at World War II History

WWII Events Today, September 22 Sep 22, 1940Japan was
formally granted air bases and the rights to maintain troops
in French Indochina under terms of a treaty signed in Hanoi.
The governor general of Indochina, General Georges Catroux
sought Allied air to fight the Japanese, but Britain (and the
United States) said it was not possible to consider military
action in Asia. Sep 22, 1940Uruguay arrested eight Nazi
leaders on charges of conspiring against the state. Sep 22,
1941Britain told Finland to conclude a peace treaty with
Russia or risk being regarded as a belligerent. Sep 22,
1941German troops cut…

2. “They Considered Our Squadrons as One.” by NHHC at Naval History Blog

Cooperation with coalition partners in the protection of the
sea lanes is nothing new to the Navy. We were practicing such
cooperation from the early days of our history. During 1823,
for example, the United States Navy’s West Indies Squadron,
under command of Commodore David Porter, and the Royal Navy
squadron, under command of Sir [...]…

3. Two Naval Hospitals in New York State (Closed) by thomaslsnyder at Of Ships & Surgeons

I’m still in the east, and while the topic of closed Naval
Hospitals in New York State is fresh in mind, it occurs to
mention two other facilities in New York State that saw
gallant service and are now closed. In addition to Naval
Hospital Sampson, subject of my last posting, the Navy
operated hospitals in Brooklyn and St Albans in the borough
of Queens. Naval Hospital Brooklyn had its beginning when the
Secretary of the Navy purchased 25 acres adjacent to the
developing Brooklyn Navy yard in 1825. Construction work on
the hospital began in earnest in 1830, and…

4. Nathan Jeduth Smith by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project

Nathan Jeduth Smith was born in November of 1831, in Chenango
County, New York.By 1860 Nathan was possibly the same Nathan
Smith, age 23 and born in New York, living with Garrett Smith
and they were both living with a tailor named William Smith
(b. 1798) and his wife and Mirty (b. 1814) and their children
in Muir, Lyons Township, Ionia County. (Nathan and Garrett
come at the very end of the census list for the William Smith
family.) New York natives William and Mirty came to Michigan
from New York probably sometime after 1855.Nathan stood 5’10”
with blue…

5. Sunday, 22 September 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded

The big headlines of the day in today’s Observer aren’t
about warfighting at all, whether it’s overhead or overseas.
Perhaps this is because of the ‘lull in the air battle
yesterday’ (7), or maybe reporting raid after air-raid is
getting monotonous. But as with the last time this happened,
the news is that the United States is sending more aid to
Britain. Or at least it is promising ‘a very rapid stepping
up, in the very near future’ of aircraft deliveries to
Britain, currently running at 200 machines a month. This is
due to ‘the complete recovery of American…

6. The Forgotten Theaters? by Craig Swain at To the Sound of the Guns

I started out to title this post “Eastern Theater
Exclusivity,” but felt that rather bias, and off the
direction of my thoughts. Since my relocation to Virginia a
few years back, I’ve been attracted to these great eastern
battlefields. As … Continue reading →…

7. The Bismarck and the Hood by Charles McCain at World War II History

Crossposted from CharlesMcCain.com] On 19 May 1941 the
German battleship Bismarck (below left), then the largest and
most powerful battleship in the world, put to sea on a
commerce raiding cruise accompanied by the heavy cruiser
Prinz Eugen (below right). The movement of the two ships was
quickly discovered by the British and on 20 May 1941 an RAF
Spitfire reconnaissance aircraft spotted the two ships in a
fjord in Norway. The battlecruiser HMS Hood (below left) was
ordered to sea to intercept the Bismarck. She was accompanied
by the battleship HMS Prince of Wales (below right). There is
critical…

8. Guest Post by Dr. Dave Winkler Entitled “William S. Sims and Training to Shoot” by NHHC at Naval History Blog

At the dawn of the 20th Century, while the Navy fitted out
its new warships with guns of greater caliber and
sophistication, the methods used to employ them had not
changed since the days of sail. As a result, the shots-fired
to hits-registered ratio during the Spanish-American War was
appalling. Fortunately for the Americans, the [...]…

9. Saturday, 21 September 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded

On the inside cover of this week’s Illustrated London News
— the outside cover has advertisements on it — is a
photograph taken by Cecil Beaton at the Great Ormond Street
Hospital. The subject is Eileen Dunne, an air-raid victim
aged 3. The caption reads: BOMBERS’ PREY. GOERING’S ATTACKS
ON LONDON ACHIEVE LITTLE BUT THE MAIMING AND SLAUGHTERING OF
CHILDREN. This pretty much sets the tone for the whole issue
— but I’ll try to quote around those parts. The emphasis is
much more on the ‘Illustrated’ and less on the ‘News’. There
are a total of three pages of commentary on…

10. Hmdb Civil War Updates – Week of September 20 by Craig Swain at To the Sound of the Guns

A lot of activity in the Civil War category of the Historical
Marker Database this week. Seventy-four entries from eleven
states – Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri,
New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee,
and Virginia: – Burned by Federals … Continue reading →…

11. Jonathan T. Smith by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project

Jonathan T. Smith was born on January 29, 1839, in Lorain
County, Ohio, the son of Peter H. (1810-1872) and Eunice
(1814-1881).New York natives Peter and Eunice were married,
probably in New York, sometime before 1827 and they probably
resided in New York until sometime between 1836 and 1839 when
they settled in Ohio. By 1840 they were back in New York
where they remained until sometime between 1845 and 1850 when
they were living in Orleans, Ionia County, Michigan where
Peter worked a farm and Jonathan attended schools with his
siblings. By 1860 Jonathan was a…

12. The Forty-Five: Jacobites Stun at Prestonpans by n/a at About.com Military History

September 21, 1745 – Jacobite forces win the Battle of
Prestonpans. Landing in Scotland in August 1745, Charles
Edward Stuart sought to take advantage of recent events in
the War of the Austrian Succession to begin another uprising
with the goal of restoring his family to the British throne.
Moving south with a growing army, he captured Edinburgh and
was soon alerted to the approach of a government force led by
Sir John Cope. Marching east, he encountered Cope near
Prestonpans on September 20. That night, Charles’ commander,
Lord George Murray, devised a plan calling for a flank march
around the…

13. U.S. Navy Seabee Museum Update by NHHC at Naval History Blog

In preparation for the relocation to the new state-of-the-art
museum facility, the old museum will be closing the doors to
the World War II Quonset huts that it has called home since
1956 on September 30, 2010. A display chronicling the history
of the Seabees and Civil Engineer Corps since 1942 will…
remain open Monday [...]…

14. 20-Pdr, or 3.67-Inch, Navy Parrott Rifle by Craig Swain at To the Sound of the Guns

Yesterday I mentioned a 20-pdr Navy Parrott Rifle on display
in Cumberland Gap National Historical Park. Having discussed
the Army’s version of this caliber in an earlier post,
perhaps it is time to properly introduce the Navy model. The
Navy … Continue reading →…

15. Fleet Admiral Chester Nimitz, Usn by NHHC at Naval History Blog

This Army film entitled “The Big Picture: Admiral Nimitz”
looks at the life and times of of Fleet Admiral Chester
Nimitz….

16. “Roughshod Through Dixie: Grierson’s Raid 1863″ by noreply@blogger.com (Drew@CWBA) at Civil War Books and Authors

17. Thursday, 19 September 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded

I wasn’t planning to return to The Listener quite so soon,
but I can’t resist the cover of today’s issue. Such perfect
symbolism. Take your pick: Britain under siege, the defence
of ancient freedoms — or the wartime suppression of liberty.
(Another symbolic photo appears on page 414, of the bomb
crater in front of Buckingham Palace. The caption is entitled
‘Democracy of Bombs’.)

There’s certainly a theme running through this issue. The
cover story is a speech broadcast by Churchill on 11
September and reprinted on page 403. The Listener has given
it the title ‘Every Man to His Post…

18. Wars of the French Revolution: the Guns of Valmy by n/a at About.com Military History

September 20, 1792 – French forces win the Battle of Valmy.
Advancing into France, the Duke of Brunswick led an Allied
force tasked with capturing Paris and crushing the
Revolution. Capturing Longwy and Verdun, he was initially
checked by Gen. Charles Dumouriez at the Argonne. Finally
penetrating the forest, he descended on the French position
at Sainte-Menehould. Concentrating his forces, Dumouriez was
reinforced by troops under Gen. François Kellermann. On
September 20, Kellermann’s command was attacked by the Allies
and forced to assume a position on a ridge near Valmy.
Separated by a wide expanse, the two armies began a…

19. U S Naval Hospital Sampson Ny by thomaslsnyder at Of Ships & Surgeons

Your editor is traveling in upstate New York this week. On my
itinerary: the site of the WW II Naval Hospital at Sampson,
NY. Naval Hospital Sampson was established to support a huge
Naval Training Center that sprung into existence on the
eastern shore of Seneca Lake, which lies roughly in the
center of a handful of lakes Finger Lakes of New York
State–Seneca Lake is at the Center lying just to the south
of Rochester and Syracuse. This training center, like its
partner in Farragut Idaho, came into being, some historians
have it, because Navy officials and President…

20. James v. Smith by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project

James V. Smith was born on September 6, 1819, in Ontario,
Canada.James eventually left Canada and had settled in
western Michigan by the time the war broke out.He stood 5’9,”
with blue eyes, light hair and a fair complexion and was 41
years old and possibly living in Kent County when he enlisted
in Company A on May 13, 1861. He was reported missing in
action on May 31, 1862, at Fair Oaks, Virginia, and in fact
was taken prisoner and subsequently confined Richmond,
Virginia. He was paroled at Chickens Landing, Virginia on
September 13, 1862. According to the Richmond…

21. Wednesday, 18 September 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded

The Prime Minister gave a speech on the war situation to the
House of Commons yesterday, which I’ll come back to. The
Manchester Guardian has a lot on the air war, of course (5).
A big wave of enemy raiders, consisting of ‘more than 200
Messerschmitt and Heinkel fighters’ was broken up over Kent
yesterday afternoon, getting no farther than Maidstone.
Losses were small on both sides, however (possibly due to the
heavy clouds and the ‘100-mile-an-hour gale’ they fought in):
seven German aeroplanes were shot down, and three British.
Unusually, the defenders’ record was nearly as…

22. Tuesday, 17 September 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded

Sunday wasn’t just Fighter Command’s day — Bomber Command
was also hard at work, bombing targets in Berlin and western
Germany and along the invasion coast, sinking three ships and
losing no aircraft. And not just Bomber Command, either: The
Times prints a message from the Air Minister to Coastal
Command (4): I have been asked by the War Cabinet to convey
to all squadrons of the Coastal Command their admiration of
the skill and courage with which they have carried out the
vital and arduous but often unspectacular tasks allotted to
them, and of the enterprise and success with which…

23. 2010 West Coast Civil War Conference by noreply@blogger.com (dw) at of Battlefields and Bibliophiles

If you’ll be in the vicinity of America’s most beautiful city
in November, put some time aside for the 26th West Coast
Civil War Conference (Nov. 12, 13, 14). This meeting is
hosted by a different Civil War Round Table or other Civil
War-related group each year, and this marks only the second
time it’s been held in San Francisco. The first time was
about 20 years ago, hosted by the South Bay CWRT.This year,
the Friends of Civil War Alcatraz have put together what
looks to be a spectacular program on the theme of Civil War
Coastal Defenses…

24. Thirty Years’ War: Gustavus Adolphus at Breitenfeld by n/a at About.com Military History

September 17, 1631 – Gustavus Adolphus (right) triumphs at
the Battle of Breitenfeld. Crossing the Baltic Sea in 1630,
Gustavus and Swedish forces entered the Thirty Years’ War.
…Read Full Post…

25. Raaf Biographical Files From the Second World War by Jessie Webb at Australian War Memorial

At the outbreak of the Second World War, there were some 450
Australians serving with the Royal Air Force (RAF) on
short-term commissions. Once the Empire Air Training Scheme
got underway, thousands more Australians arrived in Britain.
Many of them were posted to Royal Air Force squadrons, even
though they were members of the Royal Australian Air [...]

26. Commemorating the Battle of Marathon by noreply@blogger.com (Tim Kendall) at War Poetry

The Battle of Marathon took place on 12 September 490 BC,
which makes this blog either four days late or 361 days early
in marking the 2500th anniversary.Now best remembered for
Pheidippides’ fatal run to Athens with news of the victory,
the battle has not been memorialised in art to such effect as
its successor a decade later, Thermopylae. Simonides’ famous
epitaph for the fallen at Thermopylae far surpasses the
(Simonidean?) epigram on the Athenians’ tomb at
Marathon:Ελλήνων προμαχούντες Αθηναίοι Μαραθώνιχρυσοφόρων
Μήδων εστόρεσαν δύναμινChampions of the Hellenes, the
Athenians at Marathonscattered the might of gold-bearing
Medes. Too many proper…

27. Wagner: “Patrick Connor’s War: the 1865 Powder River Indian Expedition” by noreply@blogger.com (Drew@CWBA) at Civil War Books and Authors

28. Monday, 16 September 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded

There’s no doubt what’s newsworthy today. The Daily Mail
trumpets the big battle over the Home Counties yesterday, the
‘most shattering defeat’ the Luftwaffe has ever experienced
(1): The Air Ministry state that between 350 and 400 enemy
aircraft were launched in two waves against London and
south-east England. Of these no fewer than 175 were shot
down, four of them by A.A. fire. This is a proportion of
nearly one in two destroyed. All these are “certainties,” for
the total does not include “probables.” The R.A.F. lost 30
‘planes, and ten of the pilots are safe.

A million…

29. Sunday, 15 September 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded

If it’s Sunday, this must be the Observer. Here are all the
headlines from the main news page, page 7. R.A.F. HAMMER NAZI
INVASION SHIPS In Friday’s raids, RAF bombers ‘wrecked’
massed invasion barges and fired dockyards at Calais,
Boulogne, Dunkirk, Ostend and Antwerp. A convoy of tankers
off Zeebrugge was also bombed. This represents the ‘fiercest
and most prolonged bombardment yet of Germany’s invasion
bases’. NEW TRAP FOR NAZI AIRMEN An improved balloon barrage
design extending to a greater height was responsible for
downing a German bomber on Friday. “OVER 2,000 TONS ON
LONDON” German press estimates of the…

30. Ball’s Bluff: a Little Battle With Lasting Consequences « Government Book Talk by n/a at Other Military History Stuff