Table of Contents

1. SB2U Vindicators by Steven Terjeson at World War II History
2. Hmdb Civil War Updates – Week of September 6 by Craig Swain at To the Sound of the Guns
3. Battle Ranges: Columbus-Belmont by Craig Swain at To the Sound of the Guns
4. “We Don’t Want to Kill You All in One Day!” by noreply@blogger.com (dw) at of Battlefields and Bibliophiles
5. Saturday, 7 September 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded
6. Napoleonic Wars: Bloodbath at Borodino by n/a at About.com Military History
7. Robert Service: ‘Only a Boche’ by noreply@blogger.com (Tim Kendall) at War Poetry
8. Arnold Bennett, Women and the Western Front by George Simmers at Great War Fiction
9. Maj. Gen. Benjamin Franklin Butler: the Moment He Enlisted in the Fight for Racial Equality by noreply@blogger.com (Ron Coddington) at Faces of War
10. “Foos” Fighter by noreply@blogger.com (Jimmy Price) at Over There
11. A Painful Discovery by noreply@blogger.com (Jimmy Price) at Over There
12. Exchange of Wounded Pows by Charles McCain at World War II History
13. Flak Towers of the Reich by Charles McCain at World War II History
14. Edward H. Bonekemper: a Victor, Not a Butcher: Ulysses S. Grant’s Overlooked Military Genius by Pritzker Military Library at Pritzker Military Library Podcasts
15. Full Reckoning: Life After Combat: Front &Amp; Center by Pritzker Military Library at Pritzker Military Library Podcasts
16. Book Review: Keith Shimko’s ‘the Iraq Wars and America’s Military Revolution’ by David Ucko at Kings of War
17. Friday, 6 September 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded
18. New Second World War Galleries Open by Liz Holcombe at Australian War Memorial
19. Thursday, 5 September 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded
20. World War I: Allies Stand at the Marne by n/a at About.com Military History
21. Wednesday, 4 September 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded
22. Willie – Installment 3 by bl@pool.cornwall.sch.uk (Pte Harry Lamin) at WW1: Experiences of an English Soldier
23. Grunt Padre: the Story of Lieutenant Vincent R. Capodanno, Usnr by NHHC at Naval History Blog
24. Theater Review: Sink the Belgrano! by noreply@blogger.com (Robert Farley) at Other Military History Stuff

Contents

1. SB2U Vindicators by Steven Terjeson at World War II History

SB2U Vindicators of Scouting Squadron (VS) 41 pictured in
flight over the Atlantic on September 7, 1942 General
characteristics Crew: Two, pilot and gunner Length: 34 ft 0
in (10.36 m) Wingspan: 42 ft in (12.80 m) Height: 10 ft 3 in
(3.12 m) Wing area: 305 ft² (28 m²) Empty weight: 4,713 lb
(2,138 kg) Loaded weight: 6,379 lb (2,893 kg) Max takeoff
weight: 7,332 lb (3,326 kg) Powerplant: 1× Pratt & Whitney
R-1535-96 Twin Wasp Jr radial engine, 825 hp (616 kW)
Performance Maximum speed: 251 mph (404 km/h) Range: 630 mi
(1,014…

2. Hmdb Civil War Updates – Week of September 6 by Craig Swain at To the Sound of the Guns

Forty-eight additions to the Civil War category at the
Historical Marker Database this week, from Civil War related
sites in Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Indiana, Missouri,
New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Texas,
Utah, Virginia, and Wisconsin. Here’s the list: … Continue
reading →…

3. Battle Ranges: Columbus-Belmont by Craig Swain at To the Sound of the Guns

On the ride home, we stopped off at Columbus-Belmont State
Park in Columbus, Kentucky. The park is a great example of
moderating recreational use at a historic site. Erosion has
cut through much of the extensive fortifications that lined
the … Continue reading →…

4. “We Don’t Want to Kill You All in One Day!” by noreply@blogger.com (dw) at of Battlefields and Bibliophiles

The partial quote at top is attributed to the Modoc Chief
Scarfaced Charley.Last Monday I asked my faithful reader(s)
what three particular Civil War generals had in common. I
posted a link on Facebook, where one well-versed individual
came up with the answer after I narrowed it down with a
comment about Indian Wars. The answer is that Generals
Wright, Howe, and Thomas all had a son killed on April 26,
1873, during the Modoc War (though General Wright preceded
his son in death, having drowned in 1865 while en route to
his new command). Man-for-man…

5. Saturday, 7 September 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded

Today’s New Statesman and Nation has little to say about a
German invasion or aerial strategy, unlike the Spectator
yesterday, aside from a brief paragraph in the editorial
comments (221) noting that German bombers now have an equal
number of fighters as escorts: The primary object of these
attacks has been to engage and destroy as many British
fighters as possible. An invasion is only possible if our
defence fighters can be seriously weakened. It does however
have quite a bit to say about air-raid precautions,
reflecting its left-wing stance. The near-constant raid
warnings are interrupting war…

6. Napoleonic Wars: Bloodbath at Borodino by n/a at About.com Military History

September 7, 1812 – Russian and French forces clash at the
Battle of Borodino. Invading Russia in mid-1812, Napoleon
sought to quickly defeat the enemy. Hampered by infighting
and surprised by the speed of the French advance, the
Russians repeatedly failed to establish a defensive line and
fell back towards Moscow. Pursuing the enemy, the French
supply situation became desperate as they penetrated deep
into Russia. Turning, Prince Mikhail Kutuzov was able to
assume strong defensive position near Borodino. After
preliminary actions on September 5 and 6, Napoleon elected to
conduct a series of frontal assaults on the Russian lines…

7. Robert Service: ‘Only a Boche’ by noreply@blogger.com (Tim Kendall) at War Poetry

The portrayal in verse of the enemy soldier has been one of
this blog’s recurring subjects. Rarely glimpsed during the
First World War, Fritz is most likely to be encountered as a
corpse, ‘Dribbling black blood from nose and beard’, or lying
inert while a ‘happy warrior’ stabs him again and again.The
best time for conversation and reconciliation between warring
soldiers is after death. The dead German in ‘Strange Meeting’
recognises the poem’s speaker, ‘For so you frowned /
Yesterday through me as you jabbed and killed’. Similarly,
Ivor Gurney imagines in ‘The Target’ that, if he is killed,
he will…

8. Arnold Bennett, Women and the Western Front by George Simmers at Great War Fiction

In Arnold Bennett’s Imperial Palace (1931) the central
character, Evelyn, is having a fling with Gracie, the
impulsive daughter of a millionaire, in Paris. In a huge
department store they watch the spectacle of “half the women,
bareheaded and in black, helping the other half, hatted and
in colours, to adorn their persons for the allurement of
absent males: while at broad, sloping desks men were writing
out bills and receiving cash, cash, endless cash, and in the
parcels-enclosures girls and boys were tying up parcels,
parcels, parcels.” Gracie comes out with the rather
surprising comment: “There are too…

9. Maj. Gen. Benjamin Franklin Butler: the Moment He Enlisted in the Fight for Racial Equality by noreply@blogger.com (Ron Coddington) at Faces of War

Political general Benjamin Butler (1811-1893) is not
remembered especially well by history. He left his brief
tenure as military commander of occupied New Orleans with the
nickname “Beast Butler” for his infamous General Order 28,
and his lackluster leadership of the Union Army of the James
at Petersburg and Fort Fisher cost him his major general’s
stars a few months before the war ended.There was another
side to Butler — the radical Republican Massachusetts
Congressman who proposed (with Massachusetts senator Charles
Sumner) the Civil Rights Act of 1875. It banned racial
discrimination from public places. The Supreme Court struck
it…

10. “Foos” Fighter by noreply@blogger.com (Jimmy Price) at Over There

As any curator will tell you, one of the best parts of
creating an exhibit is doing original research. Spending time
with original letters, diaries, and memoirs that have
wallowed in obscurity for decades is a thrilling
experience.When I was conducting the research phase of Ready
To Do My Part, I spent many hours at the Library of Virginia
going through the files of the Virginia War History
Commission. Established in January of 1919 to collect, edit,
and publish source material on Virginia’s participation in
the Great War, the Virginia War History Commission fulfilled
it’s mission for nine years before…

11. A Painful Discovery by noreply@blogger.com (Jimmy Price) at Over There

In my last post I discussed some of the inherent joys in
doing original research on the First World War.However, this
can be a double-edged sword, as I found out in the midst of
my research for my upcoming exhibit Ready To Do My Part:
Henrico County & World War I.Case in point, Lieutenant Newton
B. Ancarrow of the 317th Infantry Regiment, 80th Division.Lt.
Ancarrow’s letters to his mother can be found in Folder 3,
Box 80 of the Virginia War History Commission files at the
Library of Virginia.The first letter I came across was
written on July 2, 1918…

12. Exchange of Wounded Pows by Charles McCain at World War II History

Crossposted from CharlesMcCain.com] It seems odd that in the
middle of total war between the Allies and Nazi Germany, that
such formalities as exchanging badly wounded prisoners-of-war
were not only negotiated but carried out. British Merchant
Marine officer Peter Guy, cited in Convoy: Merchant Sailors
At War 1939-1945 by P. Kaplan and J. Currie (4 stars),
describes an exchange which occurred in the late December of
1944. He is aboard the British merchant ship Arundel Castle
and their destination is Goteborg, in neutral Sweden where
the exchange will take place. We were granted safe passage,
and it…

13. Flak Towers of the Reich by Charles McCain at World War II History

Crossposted from CharlesMcCain.com]

This is one of the surviving towers in Vienna. You can
clearly see how massive these buildings were.

The main function of the towers was less shooting down Allied
bombers, although that was important, but more to put up such
a mass of anti-aircraft fire as to hinder bombing attacks on
the area immediately around them. Flak, a word used by both
sides, is the abbreviation of the German word
“Fliegerabwehrkanone,” which translates as “air defense
cannon”.

Exterior of flak tower in Vienna now used as a climbing wall.

Three such towers were built in Berlin…

14. Edward H. Bonekemper: a Victor, Not a Butcher: Ulysses S. Grant’s Overlooked Military Genius by Pritzker Military Library at Pritzker Military Library Podcasts

Edward H. Bonekemper visits the Library to discuss his book:
A Victor, Not a Butcher: Ulysses S. Grant’s Overlooked
Military Genius. Originally aired 11/25/05.

15. Full Reckoning: Life After Combat: Front &Amp; Center by Pritzker Military Library at Pritzker Military Library Podcasts

This program was originally recorded at the Pritzker Military
Library in downtown Chicago and features panelists: Eric K.
Schuller, Patricia Hicks, Rochelle Crump, and 1 LT Stephen
Rice. Front & Center with John Callaway: Full Reckoning: Life
After Combat. Originally aired 11/16/2004.

16. Book Review: Keith Shimko’s ‘the Iraq Wars and America’s Military Revolution’ by David Ucko at Kings of War

The forthcoming issue of Contemporary Security Policy will
contain, among a great many things, a review I wrote of Keith
Shimko‘s latest book, The Iraq Wars and America’s Military
Revolution (Cambridge University Press). The journal editors
have kindly permitted the review to be reproduced, in advance
and in full, here at Kings of War. By around December, the
original will be published in volume 31, number 3 of
Contemporary Security Review (which also, I should add,
features an article of mine on ‘Peacebuilding After
Afghanistan’). Here is the review, courtesy of Contemporary
Security Policy.

The Iraq Wars and America’s Military…

17. Friday, 6 September 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded

This week’s issue of the Spectator, an influential commentary
from the right, has a number of editorial comments and
columns about the course of the war. The leading paragraph,
on page 234, discusses Hitler’s recent speech (‘bombast [...]
lies [...] threats’), focusing on one of his statements which
suggests that ‘the German Air Force is at present is exerting
all its efforts in reply to the R.A.F.’s attacks on Germany.
There is no obvious reason why the Luftwaffe should be
refraining from doing its utmost at this moment, but if what
we are experiencing is, in fact, its utmost we can…

18. New Second World War Galleries Open by Liz Holcombe at Australian War Memorial

The Second World War galleries recently opened to the public
after a re-development that puts never-before-seen objects
alongside some remodeled existing exhibits. The Dingo Scout
car. REL23826 The new items include a rare Australian
armoured vehicle, the Dingo scout car; a captured German Flak
38 anti-aircraft gun still in its original desert camouflage;
and a unique [...]

19. Thursday, 5 September 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded

Bomber Command has been busy bombing German forests, among
other targets: the Black Forest on Monday night, the Hartz
[sic] in north-west Germany and the Grunewald north of Berlin
on Tuesday night. According to the Air Ministry communique,
issued last night and reported here in The Times (4),
‘military targets [were] concealed’ in these forests; ‘Many
fires were started which later caused explosions’. It’s
interesting to contrast these British attacks with a ‘most
determined’ German one on presumably similar terrain, a big
Scout camping ground, as reported on page 9, described in the
headline as ‘Destruction typical of the…

20. World War I: Allies Stand at the Marne by n/a at About.com Military History

September 6-12, 1914 – Allied forces halt the Germans at the
First Battle of the Marne. With the beginning of World War I,
German forces drove through Belgium and into France as
dictated by the Schlieffen Plan. Pushed back, French forces
under Gen. Joseph Joffre (right) retreated to a line behind
the Marne River. Approaching Paris, the German First and
Second Armies veered southeast from their intended line of
advance exposing the extreme German right. Taking advantage,
Joffre moved the French Sixth Army to attack. This was
detected by the German First Army which turned west to meet
the enemy…

21. Wednesday, 4 September 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded

The big news in the Manchester Guardian today (5) has
nothing to do with the air war but a deal with the United
States, which will transfer fifty elderly destroyers to
Britain in exchange for 99-year leases on bases in the
Western Hemisphere. (It seems that Roosevelt meant what he
said at Newfound Gap.) The destroyers ‘will be used for
convoy, anti-submarine work, and policing the ocean lines of
communication so vital to maintaining British exports and
imports’. The agreement should be regarded as ‘a proof of a
solidarity which will remain unaffected by the attacks of
isolationists…

22. Willie – Installment 3 by bl@pool.cornwall.sch.uk (Pte Harry Lamin) at WW1: Experiences of an English Soldier

It may seem obvious but, of course, I know more about each
succeeding generation. If there’s too much on Willie, just
stop reading. BLI’ll carry on with Willie’s story. (I think
he’s about to turn into Bill)Click on any photograph to see a
larger version.As I mentioned in the previous post, he had
met a young school teacher, Nancy, at the amateur dramatics
club. I think the “tree” character was “Heathcliffe” from
Wuthering Heights, but can’t check. Nancy was teaching at
Chaucer Street primary school which was the same school that
Bill (Willie) and, probably Connie had attended as…

23. Grunt Padre: the Story of Lieutenant Vincent R. Capodanno, Usnr by NHHC at Naval History Blog

Navy Chaplains have a long and distinguished history of
administering to the spiritual needs of Marines. One such man
was Father Vincent R. Capodanno. After his ordination in June
1957, Father Capodanno served from 1958-1965 as a Maryknoll
Missionary for the Catholic Foreign Mission Society in the
Far East. As the conflict in Vietnam escalated [...]…

24. Theater Review: Sink the Belgrano! by noreply@blogger.com (Robert Farley) at Other Military History Stuff

Sink the Belgrano!Written by Steven BerkhoffSCENA TheaterH
Street PlayhouseAugust 25-September 12Wednesday-Saturday 8pm,
Sunday 3pmSink the Belgrano! is a comedy-drama, first
performed in 1986, about the British decision-making process
that led to the destruction of ARA General Belgrano. In
structure and tone the play resembles Henry V, invoking the
patriotic interpretation of that work in service of the
argument that Thatcher ordered the sinking of Belgrano for
domestic political purposes. We decided to go because we
usually try to see a play while in DC, and seriously, how
often can you really expect to get Falkland’s…

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