A survey of military history posts from around the web, inspired by Ralph Luker’s “Notes” and “Things” at the History News Network’s Cliopatria blog. Different from Carnivals as it is my idiosyncratic collection from regular blog reading. Nominations for blogs to follow and include in this survey are welcome. As to why this is #125, it started at H-War a while back.

Table of Contents

1. The Marianas: Saipan, Guam, and Tinian by NHHC at Naval History Blog
2. The Old Paradigm by George Simmers at Great War Fiction
3. Harrison a. Sickles by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project
4. Civil War Guidebook Review: “A Tour Guide to Missouri’s Civil War” by Rene Tyree at Wig-Wags
5. War of 1812: Winder Routed at Bladensburg by n/a at About.com Military History
6. The Organization Cultures of Civil War Armies – Pt 2 by Mark Grimsley at Civil Warriors
7. The Battle From Below by Brett Holman at Airminded
8. Aaron H. Sickles by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project

Contents

1. The Marianas: Saipan, Guam, and Tinian by NHHC at Naval History Blog

In June 1944, Allied forces launched an offensive to capture
the Marianas Islands from the Japanese. Invasion forces
stormed the islands of Saipan, Guam and Tinian in succession,
supported by ships and aircraft of the United States Navy.
Offshore, the Battle of the Philippine Sea proved a decisive
victory for the Allies. This United States [...]…

2. The Old Paradigm by George Simmers at Great War Fiction

I’m reading (for review elsewhere) Elizabeth Vandiver’s
excellent book on the influence of the Classics on First
World War poetry, Stand in the Trench, Achilles. Vandiver is
a writer who has done her homework. Not only does she draw
attention to writers who do not usually figure in accounts of
the War’s poetry (I want to find out more about Alec de
Candole, for instance), but her deep knowledge of classical
texts illuminates poems that one thought one knew – see her
account of Homeric echoes in Julian Grenfell’s “Into Battle”,
for example. Mind you, I warmed immediately to her book…

3. Harrison a. Sickles by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project

Harrison A. Sickles was born in 1841, in Michigan and the son
of James (b. 1797) and stepson of Lucy (b. 1801).James was
born in New Jersey and was probably married to New York
native Lucy at some point before 1850. In any case, sometime
between 1833 and 1836 James moved his family to Michigan and
by 1850 Harrison was attending school with five of his older
siblings and living with his family in Lansing, Ingham
County. By 1860 James had moved his family to Dewitt, Clinton
County.Harrison was 20 years old and probably living in
Clinton County when…

4. Civil War Guidebook Review: “a Tour Guide to Missouri’s Civil War” by Rene Tyree at Wig-Wags

I was very pleased to receive a review copy of Gregory H.
Wolk’s new book, A Tour Guide to Missouri’s Civil War: Friend
and Foe Alike. This is a book that can be enjoyed by Civil
War enthusiasts anywhere. Wolk provides a well crafted
overview of the history that lead up to the war and why that
history was particularly volatile in Missouri and along its
borders. Stuart Symington, Jr.’s fine “Foreward” sets the
scene for Wolk’s exploration of why Missouri’s Civil War
experience lasted longer and was arguably uglier than that of
any other state. You may be…

5. War of 1812: Winder Routed at Bladensburg by n/a at About.com Military History

August 24, 1814 – Brig. Gen. William Winder (right) is
defeated at the Battle of Bladensburg. Pressing up the
Chesapeake Bay, British forces under Maj. Gen. Robert Ross
began landing at Benedict, MD, on August 19, 1814. Moving
against Washington, DC, they encountered little resistance
until reaching Bladensburg on August 24. Here they were
opposed by a largely militia force led by Winder. Poorly
deployed in a series of defensive lines, the American troops
were driven back one line at a time by Ross’ veteran forces.
Though the Americans defense inflicted greater casualties
than sustained, the bulk of Winder’s men fled…

6. The Organization Cultures of Civil War Armies – Pt 2 by Mark Grimsley at Civil Warriors

The second half of “Sherman’s Armies in 1864: A Study in
Organizational Culture,” a paper I gave at the Society for
Military History annual meeting in May. (The first half is
here.) The origin of the organizational culture of the Army
of Northern Virginia corresponds more closely to the second
wellspring identified by Schein: the learning [...]…

7. The Battle From Below by Brett Holman at Airminded

I haven’t seen it yet but the September 2010 issue of BBC
History Magazine (out now in the UK, probably in a couple of
months in Australia) should have an article of mine in it.
It’s not quite the cover story but is one of several articles
on the Battle of Britain. Mine looks at how British civilians
at the time perceived the Battle — meaning not just the
daylight operations but the start of the Blitz and the threat
of seaborne invasion. It’s the first time I’ve been
commissioned to write on a particular topic and I quite
enjoyed the…

8. Aaron H. Sickles by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project

Aaron H. Sickles was born in 1840 in Cattaraugus or Monroe
County, New York, probably the son of George (1810-1872) and
Nancy Lovina (b. 1816).His first name was spelled variously
as Amon, and Aman. On his enlistment paper his own signature
appeared to be Anan or Aman H., although the officer filling
out the form spelled his name as Aaron.In 1840 there was a
George Sickles living in Chili, Monroe County, New York. In
any case, Pennsylvania or New York native George and New
York-born Lovina were presumably married in New York where
they resided for some…

About these ads